Classification of crops and their uses Classification according to forms

Subject : 

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE

Term :

1ST TERM

Week:

WEEK 5

Class :

Primary 5

Topic :

Classification of crops and their uses Classification according to forms

Previous lesson : 

The pupils have previous knowledge of

Processes of soil formation

 

Behavioural objectives :

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to

  • Name three ways by which we can classify crops
  • What are perennial crops? Give examples
  • Classify these crops according to their forms: maize, beans, water-leaf, soya beans, cassava, pepper and cocoa.

 

Instructional Materials :

  • Wall charts
  • Pictures
  • Related Online Video
  • Flash Cards

Methods of Teaching :

  • Class Discussion
  • Group Discussion
  • Asking Questions
  • Explanation
  • Role Modelling
  • Role Delegation

 

Reference Materials :

  • Scheme of Work
  • Online Information
  • Textbooks
  • Workbooks
  • 9 Year Basic Education Curriculum
  • Workbooks

 

Content :

 

 

CLASSIFICATION OF CROPS AND THEIR USES

Farmers plant many crops. Examples are maize, rice, tomato, pepper, okra, kola nut, beans and groundnut. We can classify all crops in various ways, mainly: according to forms and lifespan and according to types and uses

Classification by Forms

The lifespan of a crop, however, is the average length of time that it will live. For example, some crops, such as yams, may live for one year. Others, such as the oil palm, may live for many years.

Crops differ in their forms and lifespan. The form of a crop is the arrangement of its external parts (its parts that can be seen) in such a way that can be used to identify it. For example, a bean seedling has its parts arranged differently from a maize seedling.

There are two major forms of crop plants: monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Monocots

Monocotyledons or monocotyledonous crops are crops that have one seed leaf buried in the soil after germination. An example is the maize seedling. The seed provides food for the plant when it starts to grow.

Monocots have only one seed leaf inside the seed coat. It is often only a thin leaf, because the endosperm to feed the new plant is not inside the seed leaf.

Dicots

Dicots have two seed leaves inside the seed coat. They are usually rounded and fat, because they contain the endosperm to feed the embryo plant.

Dicotyledons or dicotyledonous crops, on the other hand, are crops with more than one seed leaves carried above the soil after germination. An example is the bean seedling. The cotyledons supply the seedling with food after germination. They also protect the stem of the seedling when it first appears above the soil.

 

 

Presentation

 

The topic is presented step by step

 

Step 1:

The class teacher revises the previous topics

 

Step 2.

He introduces the new topic

 

Step 3:

The class teacher allows the pupils to give their own examples and he corrects them when the needs arise

 

 

Conclusion

The class teacher wraps up or conclude the lesson by giving out short note to summarize the topic that he or she has just taught.

The class teacher also goes round to make sure that the notes are well copied or well written by the pupils.

He or she does the necessary corrections when and where  the needs arise.

 

Evaluation

  • What is monocotyledon
  • Mention three crops that are monocotyledon
  • Write out the classification of crops according to their lifespan.
  • Classify the crops according to their uses.
  • Classify these crops according to their forms: maize, beans, water-leaf, soya beans, cassava, pepper and cocoa.

 

 

Assignment

Prepare for the next lesson by reading about

 

Classification of crops based on their Lifespan

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