Changes in States of Matter

Subject : 

Basic Science and Technology

Term :

Second Term

Week:

Week 9

Class :

Basic 5 / Primary 5

Previous lesson : 

 

 

Topic :

Change of state of matter like melting, freezing, evaporation, condensation etc

 

 

 

Behavioural objectives :

At the end of lesson, pupils should be able to:

  • Analyse how a substance change
  • Explain melting, freezing, evaporation, condensation
  • Students will be able to identify and describe the states of matter (solids, liquids, and gases) and their properties
  • Students will be able to identify and describe the changes in matter (evaporation, condensation, freezing, melting, and sublimation)

 

 

Instructional Materials:

  • Wall charts
  • Pictures
  • Related Online Video
  • Flash Cards
  • Pencil and paper
  • Examples of solids, liquids, and gases (e.g. pencil, water, air)
  • Examples of changes in matter (e.g. water evaporating, dew forming)

 

 

Methods of Teaching :

  • Class Discussion
  • Group Discussion
  • Asking Questions
  • Explanation
  • Role Modelling
  • Role Delegation

 

Reference Materials :

  • Scheme of Work
  • Online Information
  • Textbooks
  • Workbooks
  • 9 Year Basic Education Curriculum
  • Workbooks

 

Content:

States of Matter Explained

A solid is a type of matter that has a definite shape and volume. An example of a solid is a pencil. The pencil has a definite shape and it doesn’t change shape unless you break it or bend it.

A liquid is a type of matter that takes the shape of its container, but has a definite volume. An example of a liquid is water. If you pour water into a cup, it takes the shape of the cup but it doesn’t change its volume.

A gas is a type of matter that takes the shape and volume of its container. An example of a gas is air. If you put air in a balloon, the air takes the shape of the balloon and fills it up.

Solids have a definite shape, and they don’t change shape unless you break them or bend them. Liquids take the shape of their container, but they don’t change their volume. Gases take the shape and volume of their container.

So, when you see a pencil, you know it’s a solid because it has a definite shape and volume. When you see water in a cup, you know it’s a liquid because it takes the shape of the cup but it doesn’t change its volume. When you see air in a balloon, you know it’s a gas because it takes the shape of the balloon and fills it up

Evaluation

  1. Which state of matter has a definite shape and volume? a) Solid b) Liquid c) Gas
  2. Which state of matter takes the shape of its container but has a definite volume? a) Solid b) Liquid c) Gas
  3. Which state of matter takes the shape and volume of its container? a) Solid b) Liquid c) Gas
  4. Which of the following is an example of a solid? a) Water b) Air c) Pencil
  5. Which of the following is an example of a liquid? a) Pencil b) Air c) Water
  6. Which of the following is an example of a gas? a) Pencil b) Water c) Air
  7. What is the property of a solid that makes it different from a liquid? a) It takes the shape of its container b) It has a definite shape and volume c) It takes the shape and volume of its container
  8. What is the property of a liquid that makes it different from a solid? a) It takes the shape of its container b) It has a definite shape and volume c) It takes the shape and volume of its container
  9. What is the property of a gas that makes it different from a solid? a) It takes the shape and volume of its container b) It has a definite shape and volume c) It takes the shape of its container
  10. What happens to the shape of a solid when it is broken or bent? a) It changes shape b) It maintains its shape c) It takes the shape of its container.

Answers:

  1. a
  2. b
  3. c
  4. c
  5. c
  6. c
  7. b
  8. a
  9. a
  10. a

Types of Changes in Matter

  • Evaporation is when a liquid changes into a gas. An example of evaporation is when water in a pond or a puddle on the ground turns into water vapor and rises into the air.
  • Condensation is when a gas changes into a liquid. An example of condensation is when water vapor in the air cools down and forms dew on a leaf or a blade of grass.
  • Freezing is when a liquid changes into a solid. An example of freezing is when water in a lake or a river turns into ice in the winter.
  • Melting is when a solid changes into a liquid. An example of melting is when ice in a glass of water turns back into liquid water.
  • Sublimation is when a solid changes directly into gas and vice versa, For example, dry ice or solid carbon dioxide, when exposed to room temperature, will turn into gas.

All these changes of matter are examples of physical changes, which means that the matter is not changing its chemical composition, just its physical state.

So, evaporation is when a liquid changes into a gas, condensation is when a gas changes into a liquid, freezing is when a liquid changes into a solid, and melting is when a solid changes into a liquid, and sublimation is when a solid changes directly into

Evaluation

  1. Which type of change occurs when a liquid changes into a gas? a) Evaporation b) Condensation c) Freezing
  2. Which type of change occurs when a gas changes into a liquid? a) Evaporation b) Condensation c) Freezing
  3. Which type of change occurs when a liquid changes into a solid? a) Evaporation b) Condensation c) Freezing
  4. Which type of change occurs when a solid changes into a liquid? a) Melting b) Sublimation c) Evaporation
  5. Which type of change occurs when a solid changes directly into gas? a) Melting b) Sublimation c) Evaporation
  6. What is the example of evaporation? a) Rainwater turns into ice b) Dew forms on a leaf c) Water in a pond turns into water vapor
  7. What is the example of condensation? a) Water in a lake turns into ice b) Water vapor in the air turns into dew c) Ice in a glass of water turns into liquid water
  8. What is the example of freezing? a) Water in a lake turns into ice b) Water vapor in the air turns into dew c) Ice in a glass of water turns into liquid water
  9. What is the example of melting? a) Ice in a glass of water turns into liquid water b) Water vapor in the air turns into dew c) Water in a lake turns into ice
  10. What is the example of sublimation? a) Dry ice changes directly into gas b) Water vapor in the air turns into dew c) Ice in a glass of water turns into liquid water

Answers:

  1. a
  2. b
  3. c
  4. a
  5. b
  6. c
  7. b
  8. a
  9. a
  10. a

Lesson Presentation

Introduction:

  • Begin by asking students if they know what states of matter are and if they can name any examples.
  • Introduce the concept of states of matter and explain that there are three main states of matter: solids, liquids, and gases.
  • Use examples to explain the properties of each state of matter (e.g. a solid has a definite shape and volume, a liquid takes the shape of its container but has a definite volume, a gas takes the shape and volume of its container)

Body:

  • Have students work in small groups to identify examples of solids, liquids, and gases in the classroom.
  • Have each group present their examples and explain why they think it belongs in that particular state of matter.
  • Discuss the changes in matter (evaporation, condensation, freezing, melting, and sublimation) and provide examples for each one.
  • Have students work in small groups to create short skits or drawings to demonstrate the changes in matter they have learned.
  • Have each group present their skits or drawings to the class.

Assessment:

  • Students will be assessed on their ability to identify and describe the states of matter and their properties through a written quiz.
  • Students will be assessed on their ability to identify and describe the changes in matter through a written quiz.
  • Students will be assessed on their ability to apply their understanding of the states of matter and changes in matter through the skits or drawings they create

Conclusion:

  • Review the key concepts of the lesson, including the states of matter, their properties, and the changes in matter.
  • Encourage students to continue thinking about the states of matter and changes in matter as they encounter them in their daily lives
error: Content is protected !!