FAMILY AS THE SMALLEST BASIC UNIT OF SOCIETY

FAMILY IS THE SMALLEST GROUP OF PEOPLE THAT ARE RELATED BY BLOOD, MARRIAGE OR ADOPTION

Subject: 

SOCIAL STUDIES

Term:

Ezoic

FIRST TERM

Week:

WEEK 9

Class:

JSS 3 / BASIC 9

Topic:

Ezoic

FAMILY AS THE SMALLEST BASIC UNIT OF SOCIETY

 

Previous lesson: 

The pupils have previous knowledge of

CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF CONFLICT

that was taught as a topic in the previous lesson

 

Behavioural objectives:

Ezoic

At the end of the lesson, the learners will be able to

  • say the meaning of family
  • mention members of extended family
  • explain the roles of extended family members in child development
  • point out how each member of the extended famiy is important

 

Ezoic

 

Instructional Materials:

  • Wall charts
  • Ezoic
  • Pictures
  • Related Online Video
  • Flash Cards

 

 

Methods of Teaching:

  • Class¬†Discussion
  • Group Discussion
  • Asking Questions
  • Explanation
  • Role Modelling
  • Role Delegation

 

Reference Materials:

  • Scheme of Work
  • Online Information
  • Textbooks
  • Workbooks
  • Ezoic
  • 9 Year Basic Education Curriculum
  • Workbooks

 

Ezoic

Content: 

 

Topic:

 Family as the basic unit of society

Content:

  • Meaning of family
  • Members of extended family
  • Roles of extended family members in child development

 

Meaning of family:

The family is the most important social unit of society.  This is a fact that everyone must learn.  The family is not only the basic societal unit.  It is also the basic sexual unit, the basic child-raising unit, the basic communication unit, and the basic all-around fun and friendship unit.

Ezoic

It is okay if one is not in a family at this time, but it is important to understand that the family is the basic unit of society.

A family is a unit of two dedicated to healing, even if they do not enunciate it or even understand it fully.  It means two who are happy to be together, who want to be together, and who deeply love one another, even though it can just be friends, for example, or a parent and a child.

Members of extended family

An extended family is a family that extends beyond the nuclear family, consisting of parents, aunts, uncles, and cousins, all living nearby or in the same household. An example is a married couple that lives with either the husband or the wife’s parents. The family changes from immediate household to extended household.

Ezoic

In some circumstances, the extended family comes to live either with or in place of a member of the immediate family. These families include, in one household, near relatives in addition to an immediate family. An example would be an elderly parent who moves in with his or her children due to old age. In modern Western cultures dominated by immediate family constructs, the term has come to be used generically to refer to grandparents, uncles, aunts, and cousins, whether they live together within the same household or not. However, it may also refer to a family unit in which several generations live together within a single household. In some cultures, the term is used synonymously with consanguineous family.

A definition of extended families is simply a family unit that extends past the nuclear family to include other relatives such as aunts, uncles, and grandparents. There is more to an extended family, however, than just a list of relatives, and understanding the structure of an extended family and why it can be a valuable type of family unit can help you better understand your own family structure.

An extended family can also be called a complex family, joint family, or multi-generational family. This type of family unit has multiple generations and additional relatives other than just the parents and their children living in the same household and taking on responsibilities for that household. In most cultures, the ‚Äúcore‚ÄĚ of the family is the nuclear family, the parents and their children, while additional relatives are considered ‚Äúextended.‚ÄĚ The key characteristic of the extended family is that there are multiple adults in the family that are not parents of the children, though they may also have parent-like roles and share in the responsibilities for providing for the whole family, either by contributing financially or in other ways.

Who Is Part of an Extended Family

Every extended family can be different, and the relatives who are part of a multi-generational family in addition to the parents and their children (either biological, adopted, or foster) might include:

  • Grandparents
  • Great-grandparents
  • Ezoic
  • Aunts
  • Uncles
  • Cousins
  • Ezoic

In most modern extended families, only one married couple per generation lives in the home, although there are plenty of examples of multiple married couples and their children living together. Young married couples without children may also continue to live as part of an extended family until they have their own children and are better able to move out on their own.

No matter who is a member of the extended family, there is often only one head of the household. Depending on the size of the family and the roles each member plays, that leader may be the oldest, most senior family member, or the most prominent breadwinner who contributes a significant portion of the family’s finances. Another way to determine the head of the household is by whose home it was initially; a young couple living in a parent’s home will see the older generation as the heads of household, whereas a grandparent who moves into her son or daughter’s home will see her child as the head of the household.

Roles of extended family members in child development

An extended family can also be called a complex family, joint family, or multi-generational family. This type of family unit has multiple generations and additional relatives other than just the parents and their children living in the same household and taking on responsibilities for that household. In most cultures, the ‚Äúcore‚ÄĚ of the family is the nuclear family, the parents and their children, while additional relatives are considered ‚Äúextended.‚ÄĚ The key characteristic of the extended family is that there are multiple adults in the family that are not parents of the children, though they may also have parent-like roles and share in the responsibilities for providing for the whole family, either by contributing financially or in other ways.

Ezoic

 

1. What are the different roles extended family members can play in child development?

2. How can extended family members help support parents in raising children?

3. What is the importance of having a strong extended family network for children?

4. How can extended family members contribute to a child’s emotional and social development?

5. What are some ways extended family members can help promote a child’s cognitive and physical development?

Who Is Part of an Extended Family

Every extended family can be different, and the relatives who are part of a multi-generational family in addition to the parents and their children (either biological, adopted, or foster) might include:

  • Grandparents
  • Great-grandparents
  • Aunts
  • Uncles
  • Cousins

In most modern extended families, only one married couple per generation lives in the home, although there are plenty of examples of multiple married couples and their children living together. Young married couples without children may also continue to live as part of an extended family until they have their own children and are better able to move out on their own.

No matter who is a member of the extended family, there is often only one head of the household. Depending on the size of the family and the roles each member plays, that leader may be the oldest, most senior family member, or the most prominent breadwinner who contributes a significant portion of the family’s finances. Another way to determine the head of the household is by whose home it was initially; a young couple living in a parent’s home will see the older generation as the heads of household, whereas a grandparent who moves into her son or daughter’s home will see her child as the head of the household.

Assessment

Briefly define the following;

  • Family
  • Extended family
  • Aunt
  • Uncle
  • Cousin

 

 

Who Is Part of an Extended Family?

1. grandparents

2. aunts and uncles

3. cousins

4. godparents

5. closest family friends

What Is the Role of an Extended Family?

1. to love and support one another unconditionally

2. to provide a sense of security and belonging

Ezoic

3. to teach important life lessons

4. to offer a shoulder to cry on during tough times

5. to be a source of strength and stability

Ezoic

How Does Extended Family Impact Child Development?

1.Positively:

An extended family can provide support, love, and security for children as they grow and develop. They can also teach important life lessons and values.

2. Negatively:

Ezoic

If there is conflict within an extended family, it can have a negative impact on children. They may feel caught in the middle of arguments or feel like they have to choose sides.

What Are Some Examples of Ways an Extended Family Can Support Child Development?

1. providing financial support for families in need

2. babysitting or caring for children so parents can work or have time to themselves

3. helping with homework or school projects

4.attending school functions and sporting events

5. cooking meals, doing laundry, or running errands for families who are busy or overwhelmed

How Can I Strengthen My Relationship With My Extended Family?

1. Spend time together doing activities that everyone enjoys. 2.

2. Schedule regular family gatherings or dinners.

Ezoic

3.Reach out to extended family members when you need help or support.

4.Be open and honest with one another about your thoughts and feelings.

5. Show appreciation for one another often.

 

Presentation

 

Ezoic

The topic is presented step by step

 

Step 1:

Ezoic

The class teacher revises the previous topics

 

Step 2.

He introduces the new topic

 

Step 3:

Ezoic

The class teacher allows the pupils to give their own examples and he corrects them when the needs arise

 

 

 

Evaluation:

 

 

1. How has your family influenced who you are today?

2. What role do family members play in your life?

Ezoic

3. How has your family shaped your values and beliefs?

4. What is your definition of family?

5. How has your family history affected your current relationships?

6. What is the meaning of family

7. Mention four members of the extended family

8.Explain four roles of extended family members in child development

Ezoic

9. point out how each member of the extended famiy is important

 

 

 

 

 

Ezoic

 

 

 

Ezoic

Conclusion

The class teacher wraps up or concludes the lesson by giving out short notes to summarize the topic that he or she has just taught.

The class teacher also goes round to make sure that the notes are well copied or well written by the pupils.

Ezoic

He or she does the necessary corrections when and where the needs arise.

 

 

 

Ezoic