PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION PRIMARY FIVE (5) FIRST TERM WEEKS TOPICS

PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION PRIMARY FIVE (5) FIRST TERM WEEKS TOPICS

 Rhythmic activity and explanation of rhythematic Activity

  1. Demonstration of rhythmatic activities (I).marching (II). Galloping (III). Hopping
  2. Rhythmic activities: singing, game and flock Dancing
  3. Athletics: Field event (long jump) the basic skills of approach (I). The running up (II). The take off and (III). the flight
  4. The field event: long jump landing and recovering
  5. High jump: The skills running take off, flight Landing recovery and demonstration
  6. Volley ball: History of volley ball in Nigeria and Labeling of volley ball court with demonstration
  7. Basket ball: the history of ball in Nigeria, the Facilities and equipment draw and label a basket Ball court
  8. Foot ball: the history of football in Nigeria, facilities and equipment, draw and label a football pitch with Demonstration
  9. Personal health care of the bodyParts: (I). Hair, (II). Skin, (III). Eye, (IV). Ear, (V). Nose (VI). Teeth
  10. School health programme: meaning of school Health programme (II). Component
  11. School health programme: Importance of school Health programme
  12. Revision and Examination

WEEK1&2

RHYTHIMIC ACTIVITY

BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES; At the end of the lesson, pupils should be able to:

  1. What are rhythmic activities?
  2. List three types of rhythmic activities.
  3. Mention two differences between marching and galloping Instructional materials

Different kind of Charts and references materials Scheme of work

And other relevant materials

6 years basic Education curriculum Online information

BUILDING BACKGROUND/CONNECTION PRIOR TO KNOWLEDGE:

Pupils are familiar with the topic in their previous classes.

CONTENT

What are rhythmic activities?

Rhythmic activities are activities that involve dance-like movements. They are activities that could be accompanied or enhanced with music. Their movements are regular as in musical beats.

Types of rhythmic activities

Rhythmic activities include the following:

  1. Marching
  2. Galloping
  3. Hopping
  4. Marching

Marching refers to the organised, uniform and, steady walking forward, usually associated with soldiers. It can also be defined as walking forward in

regular steps with others. It usually involves groups of people (e.g. soldiers, students) and not individuals.

  1. Galloping

This is when a person jumps with the two legs off the ground at the same time. It could also be a jump and a run, in which there is a lead leg and a trail leg (with the same leg always in front) and the other following.

  1. Hopping

This means to jump lightly, either on the same spot or moving forward.

 

Assessment and evaluation

Teacher asks questions from pupils based on the topic Wrap up and conclusions

Teacher goes over the topic for better understanding

Exercise/Activity

  1. What are rhythmic activities?
  2. List three types of rhythmic activities.
  3. Mention two differences between marching and galloping.

WEEK 4&5

TOPIC: FIELD EVENT

BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES; At the end of the lesson, pupils should be able to:

  1. Define long jump
  2. Mention the stages in long jump

Instructional materials

Different kind of Charts and references materials Scheme of work

And other relevant materials

6 years basic Education curriculum Online information

BUILDING BACKGROUND/CONNECTION PRIOR TO KNOWLEDGE:

Pupils are familiar with the topic in their previous classes. CONTENT

Long jump (Field events)

Long jump is a field event which involves running and then jumping for a distance from a spot into a flat surface called landing pit. The event requires speed, spring and a great deal of body control. The jump has the following five stages (skills):

1 The approach run or run-up 2 The take-off

  1. The flight
  2. The landing
  3. The recovery
  4. The approach run or run-up

The run-up is the running to approach the take-off board. The runway for the run-up has a minimum of fifteen strides for a beginner and a minimum length of 40 meters for adults. The run-up is to prepare the jumper to cover some long distance when he jumps/leaps forward.

  1. The take-off

The take-off is the stepping on and off the take-off board to put the jumper in the air. It is done with one leg (single take-off), and it is an upward and forward movement. The stronger leg is the take-off leg in order to give the jumper a good spring. The take-off board is usually made of wood.

  1. The flight

The flight is the action of the jumper in the air after take-off.

  1. The landing

The landing is the arrival at the landing pit. It involves learning to land properly inside the pit without committing any landing fault or sustaining an injury. It is advisable for jumpers to keep the legs wide apart while landing for effective balance, and to fall forward while landing.

  1. The recovery

This is the stage where the jumper regains his position after landing. He maintains his balance and moves forward. He should not walk backward in the pit. If he does, his jump shall be regarded as ‘no jump’.

Assessment and evaluation

Teacher asks questions from pupils based on the topic Wrap up and conclusions

Teacher goes over the topic for better understanding Exercise

  1. Long jump is a event.
  2. Long jump involves jumping from

to _ .

  1. Mention four stages in long jump.
  2. The take-off board is made of

.

  1. is the last phase in long jump.

WEEK 6

TOPIC: HIGH JUMP

BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES; At the end of the lesson, pupils should be able to:

  1. Define high jump
  2. Mention the stages in long jump
  3. State the equipment for high jump. Instructional materials

Different kind of Charts and references materials Scheme of work

And other relevant materials

  1. years basic Education curriculum Online information

BUILDING BACKGROUND/CONNECTION PRIOR TO KNOWLEDGE:

Pupils are familiar with the topic in their previous classes. CONTENT

HIGH JUMP

High jump is a field event that involves jumping for height over a raised object into a specified area (landing foam). It is done with a single take-off (one leg only).

High jump equipment

The equipment needed for high jump are: 1 The upright/Poles

2 The supports for the crossbar 3 The crossbar

4 The landing foam/pit

Basic skills in high jump

There are five skills, which are the following:

  1. The approach run or run-up
  2. The take-off
  3. The flight (clearance of the crossbar)
  4. The landing
  5. The recovery The approach run

This is the running toward the approach take-off. The run must be long enough (between 10 and 15 strides). The jumper could approach from a straight line or from either the left or right angle. The angle of approach is determined by the style the jumper intends to use.

The approach run is slower than that of long jump because speed is of less importance.

The take-off

Take-off has one goal: jumping high. This is the point where the jumper leaps from the ground in preparation for clearing the bar. The take-off foot strikes the ground with a bend at the knee, and the body leans back and springs forward for a flight. The jumper takes off on one leg.

The flight (Clearance of the crossbar)

At this stage, the jumper must achieve a high lift before changing into any clearance technique that could be adopted in clearing the bar. A jumper should use the style that requires the least effort in attempting to clear the bar.

The landing

Landing in high jump does not require any special tactics. A jumper can land on the back, legs or on the side with the shoulder, whichever is comfortable.

Jumpers should not land on their head or neck. Where there is no landing foam, there must be enough sawdust for the absorption of landing shock.

The recovery

The recovery stage in high jump is a stage of resting after landing.

After landing, the jumper walks out of the landing area. If he stays and the crossbar falls, it shall be regarded as dislodging the bar. He should also not walk under the crossbar to the other side.

Assessment and evaluation

Teacher asks questions from pupils based on the topic Wrap up and conclusions

Teacher goes over the topic for better understanding

Exercise

  1. is a field event that involves jumping for height.
  2. Mention the basic skills in high jump.
  3. List the high jump equipment you know.
  4. What should a jumper not do when landing?

WEEK 7

TOPIC: VOLLEY BALL

BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES; At the end of the lesson, pupils should be able to:

  1. Define volley ball
  2. Mention the stages in volley ball

Instructional materials

Different kind of Charts and references materials Scheme of work

And other relevant materials

6 years basic Education curriculum Online information

BUILDING BACKGROUND/CONNECTION PRIOR TO KNOWLEDGE:

Pupils are familiar with the topic in their previous classes. CONTENT

History of volleyball

The game of volleyball was created in 1895 in the United States by Dr William Morgan. Volleyball was created as a competitive and recreational sport. In 1947, the world governing body of volleyball was formed and called International Volleyball Federation or Federation Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB). It became an Olympic Sport in 1964 in

Tokyo, Japan. Today, volleyball has spread to all parts of the world, and is a popular sport in Nigeria. It was introduced in Lagos in 1965 by the British. It later spread to other parts of the country. In 1970, the Nigeria Volleyball Federation was officially inaugurated with Mr J.C. Omoruan as its first chairman. Since that time, the game has continued to grow and develop fast in the country. The pioneer players included J.C. Omoruan, A. Oduyale and A. Ajiduah. Nigeria has participated in several international competitions, including the Olympic qualifiers, the ECOWAS Games and the All Africa Games.

Nature of the game

Volleyball has the following nature or characteristics: 1 It is a team game.

2 It is played by boys, girls, as well as adult men and women. 3 It is a scoring game.

  1. It is a recreational and competitive game.
  2. It is played by 12 players with 6 players in each team. 6 It is played on a flat field (grass or hard surface).

7 It is started by a service of the ball from either of the two teams.

Facilities and equipment

These are the facilities and equipment needed to play volleyball:

1 The court which is rectangular in shape, 18 m long and 9 m wide 2 The ball

  1. The net
  2. The net support
  3. The referee’s stand
  4. The dress – canvas shoes, stockings and pads, kneecaps and jerseys 7 Whistle

8 The score sheets and board

The facilities are the court, net support and the referee’s stand. The equipment are the ball, net, whistle, scoreboard, score sheets, and wears for the players. We will discuss two of these.

The ball

The ball should be spherical in shapeand made of leather or rubber. The ball should have only one colour. The circumference is 65 – 67cm, while the weight is 260 – 280g.

The net

The net should be 1 m wide and 9.5 m long. The net should be stretched from post to post and the flexible cable should be 2.43 m high from the ground for male teams and 2.24 m for female teams. Flexible antennae, 1.80 m long shall extend 80 cm above the net and 20 cm outside the marker to indicate when the ball is completely outside the marker.

Assessment and evaluation

Teacher asks questions from pupils based on the topic Wrap up and conclusions

Teacher goes over the topic for better understanding

Exercise

  1. Who created volleyball?
  2. In what year was volleyball created?
  3. How many players make up a team in volleyball? 4 Who introduced volleyball to Nigeria?

WEEK 8

TOPIC: BASKET BALL

BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES; At the end of the lesson, pupils should be able to:

  1. Define basket ball
  2. Mention the players for basket ball.
  3. Mention the facilities and equipment for basket ball. Instructional materials

Different kind of Charts and references materials Scheme of work

And other relevant materials

6 years basic Education curriculum Online information

BUILDING BACKGROUND/CONNECTION PRIOR TO KNOWLEDGE:

Pupils are familiar with the topic in their previous classes. CONTENT

History of basketball in Nigeria

Basketball was invented in Massachusetts, U.S.A. by Dr James Naismith in 1891. Federation of International Basketball Association (FIBA) is in charge of the game internationally, and was founded in 1932. The game became an Olympic sport in 1936 (Berlin Olympic Games). Since its creation, the game has become a popular sport in many countries of the world. The game was introduced into Nigeria in the early 1950s and the first organised basketball game was said to have been played in 1964. Today, the game is gaining much ground in the universities, polytechnics, colleges of education, and even post- primary and primary schools.

Nature of the game

It is a team game of five players a side. It is played by both men and women teams. The game is started with a centre jump by two players from opposing teams. It is played on a hard surface. The purpose of the game is to throw the ball into the opponent’s basket and to prevent the opponents from getting to

one’s team’s basket. The team that has the highest number of points wins the game.

Facilities and equipment

1 The court which is a concrete surface, 28 m by 15 m 2 The rings and the basket

  1. The backboard and the upright
  2. The balls: 74.9 – 76.2 cm in circumference and 567 – 624 g in weight 5 The uniform (pair of canvas shoes, jerseys, stockings, pads)

6 The game clock and stopwatch 7 Score sheets and scoreboards 8 Whistle

9 Player foul marker 10 Team foul marker

Assessment and evaluation

Teacher asks questions from pupils based on the topic Wrap up and conclusions

Teacher goes over the topic for better understanding

Exercise

  1. Who invented the game of basketball?
  2. The first organized basketball game was played in what year in Nigeria? 3 Give the full meaning of FIBA.
  3. The game of basketball is started with a . 5 List four equipment in basketball.
  4. List five equipment you know.

WEEK 9

TOPIC: FOOTBALL

  1. Define football
  2. Mention the players for football.
  3. Mention the facilities and equipment for football. Instructional materials

Different kind of Charts and references materials Scheme of work

And other relevant materials

  1. years basic Education curriculum Online information

BUILDING BACKGROUND/CONNECTION PRIOR TO KNOWLEDGE:

Pupils are familiar with the topic in their previous classes. CONTENT

History of football in Nigeria

Football is one of the oldest sports. Its origin is not very certain. Countries, such as England, Ireland and Italy have claimed the origin. In 1904, the Fèdèration Internationale de Football Association or International Football Association (FIFA) was formed. Football must have been introduced to Nigeria through our early contacts with the British missionaries and colonial adventurers in the early twentieth century. In 1945, Nigerian Football Association (NFA) was established and in 1959, the NFA was affiliated to the Confederation of African Football (CAF) and the FIFA., the body in charge of the game globally. Football is the most popular game in Nigeria today.

Various schools and colleges as well as football clubs all over Nigeria play the game. Nigerian national team (the Super Eagles) got the gold medal in the African Cup of Nations in 1980, and in 1994, Nigeria’s team finally reached the World Cup for the first time. Other World Cup appearances are in 1998, 2002 and 2010 in South Africa. In the junior categories, Nigeria’s Golden Eagles won the maiden edition of FIFA Kodak JVC World Cup in 1985. They also won it in 1993 and 2007. The Nigerian under-23 squad won the

Olympic gold medal in Atlanta Olympics in 1996. The Nigerian Super Falcons (female national team) are the champions in Africa. They too have represented the country on many occasions.

Nature of the game

Football is played by eleven players on each side. The game is started from the centre circle by a kick-off by a player from either of the two teams. It is played by both boys and girls, and men and women. The purpose of the game, which is of 90 minutes duration, is to score goals. Goals can be scored by playing the ball across the goal line, into the net between the goalposts. A goal could be scored by any player in the field of play.

Facilities and equipment 1 The field of play

  1. The goalposts and nets
  2. The ball with a circumference of 67.5 – 70 cm and a weight of 0.40 – 0.43 kg 4 The dresses (jerseys, stockings, hand gloves, boots)

5 The flag posts 6 Stopwatches

7 Referee’s cards (yellow and red) 8 The referee’s whistle

The field of play

The playing field for football is a rectangular space. The two longer lines are called touch lines while the two shorter lines are called goal lines.

The goalpost is placed in the centre of the goal line. Assessment and evaluation

Teacher asks questions from pupils based on the topic Wrap up and conclusions

Teacher goes over the topic for better understanding EXERCISE

  1. The senior national team is called .
  2. The senior national female team is called .
  3. The junior national team that won the maiden edition of Kodak JVC world cup in 1985 is called _.
  4. Which team won the gold medal in Atlanta Olympics?

WEEK 10

Care Of The Body Parts

Care Of The Hair

If your hair is clean, lice will not be able to live on your head. Disease germs will not be able to survive on your head too. You will not have ringworm. Boys must wash their hair everyday. You should use soap to wash your hair at least twice a week. You should comb and brush your hair properly after washing.

Girls who plait their hair must wash their hair every week and plait it again. You must always use a clean comb or brush when plaiting your hair. Dirty comb and brush may carry some disease germs. You may apply some hair cream to your hair to give it a good appearance. Girls should not plait their hair too tight. If you do, some of your hair will fall out. You will also have pains and headache. You must not tie other fibre (attachment) to your hair to make it longer. The fibre may contain disease germs.

Care Of The Skin

You must take your bath twice everyday. You must wash the sweat and dust from your skin everyday. If you do not, your body will smell of sweat. People will not like to come near you. Take your bath in the morning before you go to school. Take your bath again before you go to bed. Because you work and

play during the day, you must wash away the dust on your skin before you go to bed and sleep. Your clothes will not be dirty then.

You must wear clean clothes after taking your bath. This will help protect your skin from dirt and dust. You will not suffer from craw-craw. You should wash your bed clothes often: at least once a week. You should sleep on a clean bed. Germs that give craw-craw do not live on clean beds.

The room that you sleep in should have fresh air so that your body may not sweat when you are sleeping .. You should try to keep your skin dry always.

Advantages of a clean skin

You feel proud and happy when your skin is clean. You took attractive when your skin is clean. People will like and come near you if your skin is clean.

Clean skin helps to protect the body from diseases. If your skin is dirty you might have craw-craw, scabies and ringworm.

How to keep the skin healthy

Always take a balanced diet. You should

always sleep In a clean and well ventilated room. For you to help your skin to be clean, you must wear clean clothes.

Care Of The Eye

As the eyes are very important to us, we must take proper care of them. You must protect them from injury. Now, let us recall what we learnt in Class Four about the care of our eyes. Can you remember some of them?

You must always clean your eyes with a clean handkerchief. You must not use dirty hands to clean your eyes.

You must not use a dirty towel or a dirty handkerchief to clean your eyes. If you do, you might get an eye disease. This may lead to blindness.

You must not use sunshades or unrecommended spectacles. They could spoil your eyes.

You should not look directly at the bright light from the sun. It is too bright for your eyes and could damage them.

You should not read in dim or poor light such as moonlight, light from palm oil lamp or candles. They could spoil your eyes too.

You should not read in the sun. The bright light could damage your eyes.

You must not injure other people’s eyes too. If something like dust or an insect gets into your eye, you must not rub it with your dirty hands. Let someone remove it for you with a clean handkerchief. You can wash your eyes with clean water to remove the dirt or insect.

If you have eye trouble you should report to your parents who will take you to an eye specialist

Care Of The Ear

The middle and the inner ear are very delicate. They can easily be damaged. Hence, you must not use sharp objects to clean your ears. You should not clean them too often because the wax in the ear protects it from infections.

If the wax is too much and you want to clean it, you should use soft cotton buds. You should use the buds gently, so that. you may not damage the eardrum. We said before that we should not allow people to hit us on our ears.

You must not hit other people on their ears too. If you have earache or if pus is coming out of your ears, you should report to your parents to take you to a doctor for treatment. You must not delay to see the doctor. If you do, your ear problem might become worse and you might become deaf.

Care Of The Nose

We learnt much about the care of the nose in Classes Three and Four. Look at the nose in this picture.

Let us think of these. Our nose has two holes called nostrils, through which we breathe. Inside the nostril are hairs which help to prevent dust and germs from getting into our body. The hairs filter the air we breathe before it goes into the lungs. This is why we find a lot of dirt when we clean nostrils with a handkerchief or tissue paper. If dust, containing disease germs, escapes through the hair into the wind pipe and lungs, you might have a cold or catarrh. This tickles inside the nose and throat. It makes you sneeze and a thick white liquid (mucus) flows from the nostril.

When sneezing, you must cover your nostril with a handkerchief or tissue paper to avoid spreading any disease. The tissue paper used, should be thrown into the latrine or dustbin. If you use a handkerchief, you should use hot water to wash it clean.

You must not spit or throw mucus (Phlegm) about the compound. If you do not have a handkerchief or tissue paper when you cough or sneeze, you could drop the phlegm on the ground and cover it up with soil to avoid spreading disease to others.

You must not use your fingers to clean your nostrils. You might damage the skin in the nostril and introduce germs. You must not allow people to hit your nose and you must not hit other people’s nose. This could cause nose bleeding.

Care Of The Mouth

Anything we eat passes through our mouth. Hence, our mouth must be kept clean always. If our mouth is clean, we would look attractive and happy.

People will like us. But if our mouth is dirty, people will not like us to talk to them because our mouth will be smelling.

We must wash our mouth every morning before we take our breakfast and every evening after dinner. This will make our mouth clean and fresh

Care Of The Teeth

Let us remember what we said before. You must brush your teeth in the morning before you take your breakfast and in the evening after dinner.

In brushing your teeth, you should brush the lower teeth upwards and the upper teeth downwards, so that you may not damage the gum. You should brush the inner side of the teeth the same way.

Whether you use a tooth brush with paste or chewing stick, you should clean your teeth the same way.This will enable you remove food particles that might have got stuck in between the teeth.

You must not use your teeth to break hard objects such as kernels, bones or hard nuts. You must not use them to open bottles. If you do, you may break your teeth and germs will get in. The teeth will then begin to decay and give you severe pains.

WEEK 11

TOPIC: School Health Programme

Behavioral objectives: At the end of the lessons, the pupils should be able to

Instructional materials

Different kind of Charts and references materials Scheme of work

And other relevant materials

  1. years basic Education curriculum Online information

Building background connection to prior knowledge: pupils are familiar with the topic in their previous classes

CONTENT OF THE TOPIC

Meaning of School Health Programme

Like the home, the school compound must be kept clean always. This is important because, with many pupils around, germs can spread very rapidly once a pupil is infected. Every pupil must take part in cleaning the school compound.

You must help to cut the grass low regularly. You must help to pick up pieces of papers, leaves and sticks from the school compound and put them in the school incinerator for burning.

You should also help to pick out broken bottles, glasses, plates, pieces of iron and other dangerous instruments from the rubbish pile and bury them.

School Health Programme Components

You must keep the classroom clean. You must scrub the floor once a week. the floor must be kept dry. You must dust the furniture, the wall pictures, the walls and ceiling.

You must not spit about in the classroom or in the compound. If you do, you may be spreading diseases to others.

You must not buy food from food hawkers. The food might have been contaminated by flies or by other people whose hands are dirty. If you want to buy food, you should buy from the person who has been authorised by your school to sell food to pupils in the compound.

You must always eat with clean hands. After doing some work, you must always wash your hands before you go into your classroom to continue your lessons.

Assessment and evaluation

Teacher asks questions from pupils based on the topic Wrap up and conclusions

Teacher goes over the topic for better understanding. Assignment

 

(Visited 1,653 times, 1 visits today)

error: Content is protected !!